Looking for Mabel Normand

Madcap Mabel Normand

 

Norbert Lusk has written articles about Mabel Normand from the time he was head of Goldwyn publicity on the East Coast.  A number of his pieces are in the MABEL NORMAND SOURCE BOOK by William Thomas Sherman.

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Picture-Play, February 1918

The Girl on the Cover

Mabel Normand discloses a new plan for making magnates laugh.

By Norbert Lusk

“I love dark windy days and chocolate cake.” Miss Normand announced with perfect gravity, “and storms, when houses blow down.”

 

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Picture-Play, December 1922

Memories on My Own Screen

By Norbert Lusk:                                                                

Part I

Many persons know Mabel Normand. She welcomes acquaintances as easily as she curves her cupid's bow with a lipstick; but few can say they truly know her. This gives me a proper opening to say that I do. That is, my knowledge is enough to make me fond. It is no new happiness.

Five years ago (in 1917), when she was made a Goldwyn star, the prospect of meeting mellifluous Mabel was quite enough to give me tremors of anticipation, even though I was no younger than I ought to have been. Not only was she on the crest of the glory that was Goldwyn, but her name sparkled with reminiscent associations.

 

 

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Picture-Play, January 1923

Memories on My Own Screen

By Norbert Lusk

Part II

If you remember, last month I coined a word, “mablescent.” (ed. The term “mablescent” was actually first used by Truman B. Handy in Photo-Play World, May 1920) It may have explained itself by its nearness to the name of Mabel Normand. Then again it may weigh on your mind to learn that Noah Webster didn't share my fondness for her by creating an adjective in her honor. Anyhow, in my private dictionary it means “merry, madcappish, warm-hearted true.” In short, like Mabel Normand.

It was the madcappishness in her, perhaps, that spun the yarn about that Mrs. Woodrow Wilson said when they met. She vowed, big eyed that she was not flirting with facts, but tattling the truth. This is the story. Incidental details may intensify the spotlight on the general impression of her.

  

 Picture-Play, January 1923

THE IRREPRESSIBLE ONE

by Norbert Lusk

"I love your coat – it looks like an Airedale!” (Mabel) she cried outside, before I saw her, as a means of breaking the ice after three years...“This is my darling old friend who knows all my faults but loves me just the same." - Mabel Normand.  http://looking-for-mabel.webs.com/1923octpictureplay.htm